Healthy Holiday How To’s!

Well the #holidays are upon us, and it’s all about celebrating with family/friends and, of holiday-piecourse, eating lots of food (sometimes more than we want to).

Between the mashed potatoes, buttery rolls, stuffing, desserts and sweet pies, and holiday drinks at all your favorite bars and coffee houses, it’s easy to “over-indulge”! But no matter how tempting one more piece of pie or that fancy drink may be, it’s important for us to continue to make smart and healthy eating choices during this time of year.
So here’s my ever so humble advice:

  1.  Use smart substitutions when cooking: try egg whites instead of whole eggs; use low or nonfat dairy items; serve whole grain vs white rolls; try Splenda instead of sugar; use real baked yams instead of canned or candied yams; try using sodium free seasonings or real onions and garlic cloves instead of salt, garlic salt, onion salt….just to name a few!
  2. Eat a healthy meal at home before you go to a holiday party.
  3. Pace yourself and eat slowly. Remember it actually takes 20 minutes for your brain to get the signal that you are full. Tip: put your fork down (all the way on the table people …LOL) between each bite.. and complete your chewing and swallowing before you reach for that fork again..Ha!
  4. Skip the salty pre-meal snackage.
  5. Monitor or try 86’ing the whip cream and marshmallows on those fancy coffee house drinks.
  6. Drink plenty of water at meal time and between cocktails. This will help from over-indulging.
  7. Don’t stand at the buffet table, this actually promotes you eating more food than you need. Take a plate and sit down.
  8. Take a walk after you eat or head to the gym earlier in the day. It’s important to expend more calories that you take in.
  9. Focus on socializing! Conversation is “Calorie Free!”
  10. Say “No” politely: “I couldn’t possibly have another bite, but it was so delicious!”
  11. Allow yourself only one indulgence, whether it be a cocktail, a dessert or a second helping of your favorite holiday food.

Just remember… we do have to live and it’s okay to enjoy food. Just be smart. If you are a person who goes to many holiday parties, it’s best to strategize, because before you know it, those 5-10 lb of holiday weight will creep up. And it’s easier to gain weight than to lose it!

Happy Healthy Holidays!

#holidayeating #happyholidays #eatright #Healthyeating #Howtoeatduringtheholidays #Healthyeatingtips #holidayparties #randisfitness #randisnutrition

Tuesday Tip!

eat real foodTuesday Tip!
Take some time today to learn to eat real food!
Not processed, low calorie, non fat, packaged food or supplements to make up for the nutrients you’re depriving yourself when you decide to “diet” (ugh that dreaded word again) or deprive yourself of food, when you think that skipping meals will help you lose weight!
Try eating 3 meals and 2 small snacks that are balanced with those 3 little basic macronutrients called “Carbohydrates (oohh.. yeah), Protein and Fat!”
Yes.. we NEED all three of these to create energy and satiety and ultimately survive!
 
So please…… don’t be afraid to eat REAL FOOD!!!!! 
I promise you will like it!
#Livelifetothefullest #SayNoToDiets #EatRealFood #BasicMacronutrients #WhatisRealFoodYouAsk #Don’tDeprive #energy #eatRight #Lifestyle #Healthy #WholeFoods #RealFood #RandisNutrition
Now go eat!!!!!!

 

Gluten Free “Diet” Ha!

glu·ten
ˈɡlo͞otn/
noun
A substance present in cereal grains, especially wheat, that is responsible for the elastic texture of dough. A mixture of two proteins, it causes illness in people with celiac disease.

Gluten free fad

 

A gluten-free diet (and there it is…. that dreaded word “diet” again!), is a diet that excludes gluten, a protein composite found in wheat and related grains, including barley and rye.
Gluten can cause health problems in those who suffer from celiac disease and in “some” cases of wheat allergy. For those diagnosed with celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment to date. There is ongoing research and debate on non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Some people believe that there are health benefits to gluten-free eating for the general population, but there is NO published experimental evidence to support such claims.
Eating gluten free is NOT a weight loss regimen and it is frustrating to hear that people go on this diet to lose weight. So far I have not known anyone to lose even an ounce by becoming “gluten free!”
So please people learn how to eat right, portion your food, quit eating junk food and fatty foods and drinking alcohol every night…..and……Get yourself on a workout regimen!!!! Quit looking for any excuse not to actually change your lifestyle and I PROMISE you.. you will lose weight!

 

4 of the Most Common Weight Loss Mistakes

1. CUTTING OUT CARBOHYDRATES

  • Everyone NEEDS carbs to survivekeep-calm-and-eat-carbs-13
  • Carbs are you PRIMARY “Energy” source
  • Carbs are converted to glucose, which is taken up by your brain and skeletal muscles
  • The rest is stored in the liver as glycogen, which can be used as an immediate energy source or stored for future use

2. NOT EATING ENOUGH PROTEIN

  • Protein is not an energy course, but can AID in replenishing glycogen repletion
  • Protein creates better muscle refueling and rebuilding
  • Protein reduces Cortisol, a hormone that breaks down muscle
  • Amino acids from protein, if readily available, enhances muscle repair and reduces muscle soreness
  • Protein HELPS BURN FAT!!

3. SKIPPING MEALS

  • Skipping meals can actually have the reverse effect than you’d expect
  • When skipping meals, your body goes in to the “fed-fast” state (starvation mode)
  • Your brain will use all the carbs you ate to function and your body will go into lipolysis – in essence, turns everything else in to fatty acids and stores it in your adipose tissue

4. LISTENING TO YOUR FRIENDS ADVICE!

  • What works for your friend MAY NOT WORK FOR YOU!   Advice Square
  • Everyone’s body chemistry is completely different
  • Weight loss strategies MUST be individualized to YOUR needs, likes, goals, and comorbidities, that all need to be considered when starting a new program that’s going to produce RESULTS!

What you always wanted to know about macronutrient metabolism when working out!

QUESTION

  • Would you drive your car without gas? No… because you won’t get tfueloo far!
  • Then why would you exercise on an empty stomach? Exercising whenyou are under-fueled is like running on fumes and results in sluggish performance. And does not help you burn fat!
  • If I were to eat better, would I recover faster?
MACRONUTRIENTS
Energy is stored in the chemical bonds of macronutrients as Carbohydrates, Fat and Protein. Carbohydrates and fat are the primary energy source, while amino acids from protein are used infrequently as a fuel source for physical activity – they are primarily used for structure, function and regulatory purposes.
OmeletDietary fats are stored as triglycerides in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle.
Intramuscular triglycerides are an important fuel source especially during prolonged aerobic activity.
By weight, fats provide more than twice the amount of energy than carbohydrates or protein. Therefore this is an efficient way to store energy.
Dietary Carbohydrates are converted to glucose and stored in the liver as glycogen. Liver releases glucose as needed to maintain normal blood sugar. Glucose is then taken up by the brain and skeletal muscles. Glucose can then be used as an immediate energy source or stored in the liver and muscle tissue.
METABOLISM
Carbohydrate is the primary fuel source during physical activity and is transformed into carbohydrate storage areas. The carbs are ultimately stored as muscle & liver glycogen and blood glucose. Because these stores are limited it is crucial to consum
e adequate amounts of carbohydrates on a daily basis in order to replenish your muscle and liver glycogen between daily training sessions. If you are exercising for 60 minutes or more
you need to balance water and energy output with enough fluid to match your sweat loss and enough carbs to provide energy and maintain your blood sugar levels.

Oatmeal

Consuming carbohydrates prior to exercise helps your performance by “topping off” the muscle and liver glycogen stores.
It is recommended that you consumer 1.0g/kg carbs 1 hour before moderately hard exercise or 2.0g/kg 4 hours before. MilkConsuming a small amount of protein before exercise (such as a glass of milk or a yogurt) can optimize recovery by providing a “ready-and-waiting” supply of amino acids after exercise.
Consuming carbohydrates during exercise can improve performance by maintaining blood sugar levels. During a moderate to hard endurance workout, carbs supply ~50% of the energy. As you deplete carbohydrates from your muscle glycogen stores, your body relies on blood sugar for energy.It is recommended that consuming 100-250 kcal (25-60 g) of carbs per hour during endurance exercise (after the 1st hour) can increase stamina – this can be mixed between carbohydrate rich foods or fluids (such as energy drinks containing carbs). water
Consuming carbohydrates  after glycogen-depleting exercise restores your muscle and liver glycogen and stimulates the release of insulin (hormone) helping to build muscles
It is recommended to consume 1.5g/kg immediately after exercise. If you’re not hungry it is recommended to consumer a high carbohydrate drink. Consuming carbs after your workout helps enhance the rate of muscle glycogen synthesis because the muscle cell is more likely to take up glucose and because the muscle cells are more sensitive to the effects of insulin during this time which promotes synthesis. Therefore eating the appropriate foods and fluids can affect your recovery.
ADDING PROTEIN
Adding to post exercise carbohydrate meal may enhance glycogen repletion; Creates  better muscle refueling and building response; Reduces cortisol, a hormone that breaks down muscle.Having amino acids from protein readily available enhances the building and repairing of muscles as well as reducing muscle soreness.Peanut butter toast
It is recommended to consume 10-20 g of protein after exercise!
Now this is not a “one size fits all” set of recommendations because everybody’s body shape and size are different. Not all individuals work out at the same rate of intensity, nor for the same amount of duration.  These are basic recommendations and can obviously be “tweaked” to fit your individual needs!
Happy eating and exercising!
Randi Drasin, MS, RD
Resources:
Nancy Clark “The Science of Eating for Sports Success”
Mary Dunford “Sports Nutrition: A Practice Manual for Professionals 4th Edition”